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HEALTH BEHAVIOUR IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION COLLABORATIVE CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY

 

HBSC

For 30 years HBSC has been a pioneer cross-national study gaining insight into young people's well-being, health behaviours and their social context. This research collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Europe is conducted every four years in 44 countries and regions across Europe and North America. With adolescents making about one sixth of the world's population, HBSC uses its findings to inform policy and practice to improve the lives of millions of young people. [more]



Latest News:
HBSC Slovakia Publishes: Is the association between screen-based behaviour and health complaints among adolescents moderated by physical activity?

A growing number of school-aged children are spending excessive amounts of time on screen-based activities, such as watching TV or using portable or desktop computers. Whereas the number of children who spend time being physically active every day is decreasing. This recent publication, from members of the Slovakian HBSC team using data from 2010, investigates the relationship between screen-based activities and selected health complaints, analysing the extent to which physical activity moderates this association.

The authors report that time spent in front of the computer increased the chance of reporting health complaints (such as headache, backache, sleep difficulties and irritability). Watching TV for more than 3 hours per day increased reporting of headaches, feeling low, being irritable and feeling nervous. These associations were not moderated by physical activity.

see here for further details

contact: Mr Joseph Hancock

item 2727
[27-01-2015 to 30-04-2015]

 
 
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For almost 30 years HBSC has been a pioneer cross-national study gaining insight into young people's well-being, health behaviours and their social context. This research collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Europe is conducted every four years in 43 countries and regions across Europe and North America. With adolescents making about one sixth of the world's population, HBSC uses its findings to inform policy and practice to improve the lives of millions of young people.
University of St Andrews
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9TF
UK