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HEALTH BEHAVIOUR IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION COLLABORATIVE CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY

 

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HBSC Scotland Publishes: Urban-rural and deprivation effects on smoking in Scottish boys and girls

Adolescent smoking rates have different links with individual and area deprivation for boys and girls. New research shows that among girls, odds of smoking increased with both individual and area deprivation. Among boys, smoking was only associated with area-level deprivation. When population density was examined, odds of smoking were higher in remote and rural areas compared to urban areas for girls.

Researchers from the Child and Adolescent Health Unit at the University of St Andrews and the Medical Research Council/Chief Scientist Office Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow studied children aged 15 in Scotland. Using data from the Scottish 2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, the researchers examined associations of smoking with school type, family affluence, area level deprivation and rurality of home. These results give a measure of adolescent smoking inequalities four years following the smoking ban in public places and a baseline indication of inequalities prior to the tobacco display ban. Policy makers and campaigners should recognise social, cultural and geographical explanations for the high prevalence of boys’ and girls’ smoking in deprived neighbourhoods and of girls’ smoking in rural areas. Monitoring the impact of this initiative on geographic and socioeconomic inequalities is recommended.

The paper can be found here.

see here for further details
contact: Mr Joseph Hancock

item 2166
[25-02-2014 to 01-07-2014]

 


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