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HEALTH BEHAVIOUR IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION COLLABORATIVE CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY

 

HBSC News

News Item:
Announcement of new HBSC International Coordinator

We are pleased to announce that Dr Jo Inchley has been elected as the new HBSC International Coordinator. She took over this position in June 2015 from Professor Candace Currie who stood down from the role after 20 years. During this time, the HBSC study has grown to become the largest study of adolescent health in the European Region, now including 44 countries across Europe and North America.

Dorothy Currie was also elected as the new Deputy International Coordinator, taking over from Professor Pernille Due (HBSC Denmark) who held this position for the last 6 years.

Jo is a public health researcher who has worked in the field of international child and adolescent health for over 15 years, focusing particularly on health promotion, physical activity and school health. Dorothy is a senior statistician with extensive experience in adolescent health, working in the areas of survey methodology and comparative indicators of health. Both are members of the Scottish HBSC team, based in the Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit (CAHRU) in the School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, Scotland. The HBSC International Coordinating Centre will continue to be based at CAHRU and staff include: the Assistant International Network Coordinator (Taryn Young), HBSC Network Officer (vacant), HBSC Communications Officer (Joe Hancock) and Research Administrator (Karen Hunter).  For enquiries about the HBSC study, please contact info@hbsc.org.

The HBSC network is grateful to Candace and Pernille for their leadership of the HBSC study and their hard work over many years. Both continue to be actively involved in the study, with Candace leading on global development of HBSC working with countries outside of Europe and North America who wish to use the HBSC study model, research protocol and instruments, testing and adapting these for local contexts. Researchers can access HBSC research tools to conduct their own studies and also register these as ‘HBSC Linked Projects’.  An HBSC network group has been established which is dedicated to supporting the growth of HBSC linked projects and building HBSC as a tool for action to improve the health of young people around the world. Further information on linked projects may be found here: www.hbsc.org/membership/linkedprojects.

In addition to her continuing HBSC work, Candace has recently received a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award which will provide a platform for a new programme of research combining her interests in social inequalities and pubertal processes.

This is an exciting time for the study as we look forward to launching the new data access portal next month to give increased access to HBSC data for policy and academic use. Production of the 2013/14 HBSC International Report is also underway and will be launched, in collaboration with WHO Europe, in March 2016. In addition, we are undertaking a major review of the international protocol for the 2017/18 survey and progressing new areas of scientific work to allow us to continue to monitor and explain current trends and emerging issues affecting young people’s health and wellbeing across Europe and beyond.

contact: Mr Joseph Hancock

item 3271
[26-10-2015 to 26-01-2016]

 


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